Brandon Hunter cause of death: What happened to the ex-NBA player?

 

His mother-in-law, Carolyn Cliett, said he collapsed while doing hot yoga in Orlando, but no cause of death was announced.

“It was hot yoga, and he did it regularly,” she told NBC News. “He was in good shape as far as we know. We’re just shocked.”

Hunter, a 6-foot-7 forward, was a four-year starter at Ohio University from 1999-2000 to 2002-03. He averaged 16.9 points, 9.3 rebounds and 2.1 assists in 119 games for the Bobcats. He put up 21.5 points, 12.6 rebounds and 2.6 assists per game as a senior.

The Celtics selected him in the second round of the 2003 draft (56th overall). Hunter played in 36 games (12 starts) for Boston in 2003-04, producing 3.5 points and 3.3 rebounds per contest.

He played 31 games, all off the bench, the following season for the Magic, averaging 3.1 points and 2.2 rebounds.

Former Ohio basketball coach Tim O’Shea posted on Facebook of Hunter, “He was the best player I ever had the good Fortune of coaching — he excelled at Ohio University, and then went on to play in the NBA for Boston and Orlando, then successfully in Europe, before transitioning to a successful career as a sports agent. We stayed in touch over the years, and I was incredibly proud of the husband, father, and citizen he became.. please keep his family in your prayers.”

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WITH JUST A few days before the start of the regular season — and as the Boston Celtics were still coming to grips with an offseason full of roster turnover that continued right up to the start of training camp — Jayson Tatum decided it was time to have a conversation.

The Celtics had, just a few weeks earlier, acquired Jrue Holiday the day before camp opened Oct. 3, bringing in one of the league’s best two-way guards who had been a pillar of Boston’s biggest rival in the Eastern Conference, the Milwaukee Bucks.

WITH JUST A few days before the start of the regular season — and as the Boston Celtics were still coming to grips with an offseason full of roster turnover that continued right up to the start of training camp — Jayson Tatum decided it was time to have a conversation.

The Celtics had, just a few weeks earlier, acquired Jrue Holiday the day before camp opened Oct. 3, bringing in one of the league’s best two-way guards who had been a pillar of Boston’s biggest rival in the Eastern Conference, the Milwaukee Bucks.

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But while Boston celebrated his arrival, he brought with him plenty of questions. The Celtics had spent the summer planning to use a clear starting five: Tatum, Jaylen Brown, Al Horford, Derrick White and Kristaps Porzingis, who came to the Celtics in the first massive move of the team’s summer back in June.

With Holiday now in the fold, the Celtics had six starting-quality players — and only five spots to put them in, meaning one of them wouldn’t be introduced as a starter, and one would be sitting on the pine in the closing minutes of games.

Both topics quickly were injected into the bloodstream in Boston, with plenty of fans and those in the media opining about how it should go. But rather than letting it fester, and allowing one of the league’s biggest unanswered questions to spiral into a narrative, Tatum gathered his five teammates in a room at the team’s practice facility — without any coaches, or anyone else. He wanted to address the obvious elephant in the room.

“I wanted us to get in the room and talk about it,” Tatum told ESPN. “We all are human and have feelings, and I opened the floor and basically said, ‘There’s six of us. Only five can play at one time. One of us is not going to finish the game all the time.

“Whether it’s fair or not, me and JB are probably going to always start, and always finish the game. But we have to be held to a different standard and be able to be coached differently. Whether it’s KP and Al, one of you guys may not finish a game, and you have to be OK with that.”

Boston is an Eastern Conference-leading 11-3 heading into Wednesday’s showdown with Holiday’s old team, the Bucks, in Boston (7:30 p.m., ESPN), the first of potentially 11 meetings this season between the Eastern Conference heavyweights.

No one inside that room believes the player meeting is the sole reason for their torrid start. But everyone involved does believe it will pay dividends beyond the clarity of purpose it provided in the early going: It should, they believe, help the team do what it has failed to do throughout the Jayson Tatum Era: raise Banner 18 to the TD Garden rafters.

“I think, honestly, it was a very important moment for us,” Porzingis told ESPN. “Just to kind of look each other in the eye, and know that we’re here for one job, and to understand that we’re all going to be willing to make some sacrifices.

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